Welcome to the REFLECT Statement website

REFLECT stands for Reporting guidElines For randomized controLled trials for livEstoCk and food safeTy. It is an evidence-based minimum set of items for trials reporting production, health, and food-safety outcomes.

The aim of the REFLECT Statement is to help authors improve the reporting livestock trials with production, health, and food-safety outcomes. We have focused on both types of randomized trials, field trials and challenge studies in livestock, and the interventions may be therapeutic or preventive.

The REFLECT Statement consists of a 22-item checklist (listed below). It is an evolving document that is subject to change periodically as new evidence emerges. This website contains the current definitive version of the REFLECT Statement. The full text of the REFLECT statement is now available:

The REFLECT Statement should be used in conjunction with the Explanation and Elaboration Document.

The REFLECT Statement: Reporting Guidelines for Randomized Controlled Trials in Livestock and Food Safety: Explanation and Elaboration.

Sargeant JM, O'Connor AM, Gardner IA, Dickson JS, Torrence ME, Dohoo IR, Lefebvre SL, Morley PS, Ramirez A, Snedeker K.

J Food Prot. 2010 Mar;73(3):579-603.

The REFLECT Statement: Reporting Guidelines for Randomized Controlled Trials in Livestock and Food Safety: Explanation and Elaboration.

Sargeant JM, O'Connor AM, Gardner IA, Dickson JS, Torrence ME; consensus meeting participants*, Dohoo IR, Lefebvre SL, Morley PS, Ramirez A, Snedeker K.

Zoonoses Public Health. 2010 Jan 12. [Epub ahead of print] - PDF

The REFLECT Statement is modified from the CONSORT statement, which provides a check list for reporting trials in human medicine. Although the use of the 22-item checklist from the CONSORT statement could form the basis of an instrument to improve the quality of reporting for trials in livestock species, there are differences between human and livestock trials that necessitate some modifications to the existing CONSORT statement to maximize the benefits of its use for livestock species. The differences include two types of "participants" (the animals' owners/managers who consent to participation in a trial, and the animals who are the actual study subjects), the common use of clustered study designs, the use of a deliberate challenge to animals with infectious agents in some trials (a.k.a. challenge trials), and non-clinical outcomes (eg, production indices). These differences make the direct use of the CONSORT statement challenging.

We invite readers to comment on the REFLECT Statement by contacting us.

The REFLECT Explanation and Elaboration document explains and illustrates the principles underlying the REFLECT Statement. It is strongly recommended that it be used in conjunction with the REFLECT Statement.

REFLECT is part of a broader effort, to improve the reporting of different types of health research, and in turn to improve the quality of research used in decision-making in animal healthcare and food safety.